The Lamb of God Was a Goat! Part 1
Copyright 1994 - 2018 Bill's Bible Basics

Authored By  :
Bill Kochman

Published On :
January 14, 1999

Last Updated :
January 3, 2009


Offerings Of The Israelites, Sacrificial Animals, Without
Spot Or Blemish, Day Of Atonement, Sacrificial Goat, First
Passover, Christ - A Sacrificial Goat, Apt To Teach Without
Compromise, Sound Doctrine, Daily Sacrifice, The Sabbath
Sacrifice, Monthly Sacrifice, The Feast Of Unleavened Bread,
Feast Of Firstfruits, Feast Of Trumpets, Additional Day Of
Atonement Sacrifices, Feast Of Tabernacles, Purification Of
The Altar, Consistent Use Of The Sacrificial Goat For Sin




For a few of my readers, some of the information contained
in the following series may possibly come as a shock, and as
a surprise. There are a number of ideas and concepts which
have become an integral part of our modern Christianity, and
which have become engrained in our personal belief system,
not because they are necessarily Scripture-based, but rather
as a result of the endeavors of those who had power, as well
as control, over the translation of the original Hebrew and
Greek manuscripts into our English language. In the Gospel
of John, we find John the Baptist proclaiming:

"...Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the
world." (John 1:29b)

As it will hopefully become obvious to you by the time you
have finished reading this revelatory series, Jesus Christ,
the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world, was
consistently symbolized throughout the Old Testament, not as
a lamb, that is, not as the offspring of a ewe, that is, a
female sheep, but rather as a goat. To fully understand this
truth, let us go back in time some three thousand five
hundred years, to the days when the Lord first gave Moses
the Levitical Laws.

The books of Leviticus and Numbers describe in considerable
detail, the various types of sacrifices and offerings which
were performed by Aaron the High Priest and his sons, and by
the members of the Israelite congregation. These different
kinds of sacrifices and offerings bore such names as meat
offerings, drink offerings, wave offerings, heave offerings,
peace offerings, sin offerings and trespass offerings. With
each different type of offering, very specific procedures
had to be carried out in order to please the Lord, and to
make the proper atonement for sin when the sacrifice was a
sin offering.

Most of these hallowed ceremonies involved the sacrifice of
certain animals. These included bullocks, or young steers,
sheep, goats, turtledoves and young pigeons. In addition to
animals, they also included green ears of corn, loaves of
bread, a tenth part of an ephah of fine flour, and various
amounts of wine. When livestock was used, sometimes it had
to be male, while at other times, it had to be female. In
all cases, they had to be without spot or blemish. In other
words, they had to be the finest of the flock. Consider the
following verses:

"But whatsoever hath a blemish, that shall ye not offer: for
it shall not be acceptable for you. And whosoever offereth a
sacrifice of peace offerings unto the LORD to accomplish his
vow, or a freewill offering in beeves or sheep, it shall be
perfect to be accepted; there shall be no blemish therein.
Blind, or broken, or maimed, or having a wen, or scurvy, or
scabbed, ye shall not offer these unto the LORD, nor make an
offering by fire of them upon the altar unto the LORD.
Either a bullock or a lamb that hath any thing superfluous
or lacking in his parts, that mayest thou offer for a
freewill offering; but for a vow it shall not be accepted.
Ye shall not offer unto the LORD that which is bruised, or
crushed, or broken, or cut; neither shall ye make any
offering thereof in your land." (Leviticus 22:20-24)

In the twenty-third chapter of the Book of Leviticus, the
Lord gave Moses instructions regarding the various feast
days which the children of Israel were to observe once they
entered into the Promised Land of Canaan. The aforementioned
offerings were a part of these special occasions. These holy
events included such ceremonies as the seventh day Sabbath,
the Passover, the seven-day Feast of Unleavened Bread which
began the day following the Passover, the Feast of Trumpets,
the Day of Atonement, and the Feast of Tabernacles, which
also lasted seven days. Consider the following verses:

"Six days shall work be done: but the seventh day is the
sabbath of rest, an holy convocation; ye shall do no work
therein: it is the sabbath of the LORD in all your
dwellings. These are the feasts of the LORD, even holy
convocations, which ye shall proclaim in their seasons. In
the fourteenth day of the first month at even is the LORD'S
passover. And on the fifteenth day of the same month is the
feast of unleavened bread unto the LORD: seven days ye must
eat unleavened bread...In the seventh month, in the first
day of the month, shall ye have a sabbath, a memorial of
blowing of trumpets, an holy convocation...Also on the tenth
day of this seventh month there shall be a day of atonement:
it shall be an holy convocation unto you; and ye shall
afflict your souls, and offer an offering made by fire unto
the LORD...The fifteenth day of this seventh month shall be
the feast of tabernacles for seven days unto the LORD...
These are the feasts of the LORD, which ye shall proclaim to
be holy convocations, to offer an offering made by fire unto
the LORD, a burnt offering, and a meat offering, a
sacrifice, and drink offerings, every thing upon his day:
Beside the sabbaths of the LORD, and beside your gifts, and
beside all your vows, and beside all your freewill
offerings, which ye give unto the LORD."
(Leviticus 23:3-6, 24, 27, 34, 37-38)

As can be seen by the following verses, the sacrifices which
were made on the annual Day of Atonement, not only were used
to purify the holy sanctuary, the tabernacle and the altar,
but they were also used to cleanse the priests, as well as
the entire Israelite congregation, of their sins. It is for
this reason that this event was not taken lightly; it was a
very serious ceremony; during which time, everyone confessed
their sins before the Lord:

"And this shall be a statute for ever unto you: that in the
seventh month, on the tenth day of the month, ye shall
afflict your souls, and do no work at all, whether it be one
of your own country, or a stranger that sojourneth among
you: For on that day shall the priest make an atonement for
you, to cleanse you, that ye may be clean from all your sins
before the LORD. It shall be a sabbath of rest unto you, and
ye shall afflict your souls, by a statute for ever. And the
priest, whom he shall anoint, and whom he shall consecrate
to minister in the priest's office in his father's stead,
shall make the atonement, and shall put on the linen
clothes, even the holy garments: And he shall make an
atonement for the holy sanctuary, and he shall make an
atonement for the tabernacle of the congregation, and for
the altar, and he shall make an atonement for the priests,
and for all the people of the congregation. And this shall
be an everlasting statute unto you, to make an atonement for
the children of Israel for all their sins once a year. And
he did as the LORD commanded Moses." (Leviticus 16:29-34)

As was mandated by the Mosaic Law, on the Day of Atonement,
a bullock, a ram and two goats were to be used by Aaron the
High Priest, as a part of the sin offering which he had to
make before the congregation, in front of the door of the
Tabernacle. This is described for us in considerable detail,
beginning in the fifth verse of Leviticus chapter sixteen.
As will be noted in that chapter, the bullock was used as an
offering for Aaron's own sins, as well as for those of his
house, while the goat upon which the lot fell, was used as
an offering for the sins of the people. Consider the
following verses:

"And he shall take of the congregation of the children of
Israel two kids of the goats for a sin offering, and one ram
for a burnt offering. And Aaron shall offer his bullock of
the sin offering, which is for himself, and make an
atonement for himself, and for his house. And he shall take
the two goats, and present them before the LORD at the door
of the tabernacle of the congregation. And Aaron shall cast
lots upon the two goats; one lot for the LORD, and the other
lot for the scapegoat. And Aaron shall bring the goat upon
which the LORD'S lot fell, and offer him for a sin offering
...Then shall he kill the goat of the sin offering, that is
for the people, and bring his blood within the vail, and do
with that blood as he did with the blood of the bullock, and
sprinkle it upon the mercy seat, and before the mercy seat:"
(Leviticus 16:5-9, 15)

While the Scriptural truth contained in the previous verses
may be hard for some of you to accept, it is something which
none of us can deny. The Lord specifically instructed Aaron
to take 'two kids of the goats'; and then to use one of the
goats as a sin offering for the people. The word 'kids' is
derived from the Hebrew word 'sa`iyr', pronounced saw-eer',
which means hairy, he-goat or buck. The word 'goats' is
derived from the Hebrew word 'ez', pronounced aze, which
means a female goat, she-goat, goat or kid.

Contrary to what is clearly being stated in the previous
verses, some Christians have assumed that Jesus Christ has
always been symbolized in the Bible by a sacrificial lamb,
or young sheep; thus, He is referred to as the Lamb of God.
Like myself, perhaps some of you have embraced this idea,
based upon the traditional belief that Jesus' Sacrifice was
foreshadowed in the Old Testament, by an unblemished lamb
which was killed during the night of the first Passover in
Egypt; however, a close reading of the following verses
reveals a startling truth:

"...In the tenth day of this month they shall take to them
every man a lamb, according to the house of their fathers, a
lamb for an house: And if the household be too little for
the lamb, let him and his neighbour next unto his house take
it according to the number of the souls; every man according
to his eating shall make your count for the lamb."
(Exodus 12:3-4)

Thus far, the idea of Jesus Christ being typified by a lamb
during the night of the first Passover, seems to be upheld
by the Scriptures; however, please take note of what the
next verse states:

"Your lamb shall be without blemish, a male of the first
year: ye shall take it out from the sheep, or from the
goats:" (Exodus 12:5)

As you can quickly discover, I have separated verse five for
a good reason. It speaks a truth of which some Christians
are not aware. Before I offer an explanation, let us take a
look at a condensed version of the story a few verses later
in the same chapter:

"Then Moses called for all the elders of Israel, and said
unto them, Draw out and take you a lamb according to your
families, and kill the passover. And ye shall take a bunch
of hyssop, and dip it in the blood that is in the bason, and
strike the lintel and the two side posts with the blood that
is in the bason; and none of you shall go out at the door of
his house until the morning. For the LORD will pass through
to smite the Egyptians; and when he seeth the blood upon the
lintel, and on the two side posts, the LORD will pass over
the door, and will not suffer the destroyer to come in unto
your houses to smite you." (Exodus 12:21-23)

Please notice that in the previous verses, the word 'lamb'
is derived from the Hebrew word 'seh', or 'sey', pronounced
say, which refers to either a young sheep or a young goat.
It is for this reason that when the Lord is giving Moses his
instructions regarding the first Passover, He tells him 'ye
shall take it out from the sheep, or from the goats'. There
should be no doubt then, that the unblemished lamb could be
either a sheep or a goat. While many Christians have become
comfortable with the idea of Jesus Christ being represented
by a soft, white, unblemished lamb which was killed during
the Passover, this hallowed belief stands upon rather shakey
ground; because the Lord accepted either a young sheep, or a
goat; depending upon what was available to each Israelite
family at the time of the first Passover.

Many artistic renditions of the Lamb of God have contributed
to this false belief that Jesus has always been represented
by a lamb in the Bible; because few artists have taken the
time to understand what the Hebrew word for 'lamb' actually
means in some places in the Old Testament. We have clearly
seen that the Passover 'lamb' was either a young sheep or a
young goat; and that in the case of the most hallowed event
of the entire Jewish year, the Day of Atonement, Jesus, our
beloved Sacrificial Lamb, was actually represented by the
kid of a goat, which was slain as an atonement for sin. We
will be discussing the Passover observance of the New
Testament era in part two of this series.

Believe me; if this is difficult for you to accept, I will
be candid and admit that I also resisted this truth; and
tried to find some other way to explain it. I have been so
conditioned into imagining our Lord as a soft, little, white
lamb, and viewing a goat as something evil and satanic, that
this revelation from His Word took the better part of a day
for me to finally accept. However, as a serious teacher of
God's Word, I must be faithful to teach what is contained in
the Scriptures. I will not compromise the truth of the Word
of God for anyone; because I have no doubt that the Lord
holds me accountable for teaching the truth contained in the
Scriptures, as best as I know and understand it. At the same
time, I am sure that He is faithful to forgive me for the
things in which I am still ignorant. The Apostle Paul wrote
the following words regarding being an able teacher of God's
Word:

"A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife,
vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality,
apt to teach;" (1 Timothy 3:2)

"And the servant of the Lord must not strive; but be gentle
unto all men, apt to teach, patient," (2 Timothy 2:24)

"Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that
needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of
truth." (2 Timothy 2:15)

In the previous verses, the word 'apt' is derived from the
Greek word 'didaktikos', pronounced did-ak-tik-os', which
means apt and skilful in teaching. As I explain in 'Speak
The Pure Language Of Truth', as the servants of the Lord,
God holds us accountable for preaching the full Truth of the
Gospel. We are not to water it down, or to compromise its
message in order to not offend people; or in order to simply
tickle their ears with what they want to hear, as seems to
be the common practice with many preachers today. We need to
tell the whole truth, come what may. We must carefully study
the Scriptures and make sure that our doctrine is sound; and
not a false invention or tradition of men. This thought is
made clear by verses such as the following:

"That we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro,
and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the
sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in
wait to deceive; But speaking the truth in love, may grow up
into him in all things, which is the head, even Christ:"
(Ephesians 4:14-15)

"Be not carried about with divers and strange doctrines. For
it is a good thing that the heart be established with grace;
not with meats, which have not profited them that have been
occupied therein." (Hebrews 13:9)

"As I besought thee to abide still at Ephesus, when I went
into Macedonia, that thou mightest charge some that they
teach no other doctrine, Neither give heed to fables and
endless genealogies, which minister questions, rather than
godly edifying which is in faith: so do."
(1 Timothy 1:3-4)

"Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times
some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing
spirits, and doctrines of devils;" (1 Timothy 4:1)

"For the time will come when they will not endure sound
doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to
themselves teachers, having itching ears;"
(2 Timothy 4:3)

Taking into consideration the startling revelation from the
previous verses regarding the sacrifice of a goat on the Day
of Atonment, and the fact that the Passover 'lamb' was in
reality a lamb or a goat, we must ask ourselves, exactly how
did the idea evolve that Jesus has always been represented
by a cute, little, white lamb in the Bible? The answer can
be found by studying in detail, the Mosaic Law and the
various offerings and sacrifices which were mandated by it.
As I mention in 'The Kings Of The North And The South', as
well as in 'Once Upon A Time: A True Story', because it is
mentioned in the prophetic Book of Daniel, perhaps one of
the sacrifices with which most Christians are familiar, is
the daily sacrifice; which is also known as the continual
burnt offering, or as the morning and the evening oblation.
Consider the following verses found in Daniel's writings
which mention this sacrifice:

"Yea, he magnified himself even to the prince of the host,
and by him the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the place
of his sanctuary was cast down. And an host was given him
against the daily sacrifice by reason of transgression, and
it cast down the truth to the ground; and it practised, and
prospered. Then I heard one saint speaking, and another
saint said unto that certain saint which spake, How long
shall be the vision concerning the daily sacrifice, and the
transgression of desolation, to give both the sanctuary and
the host to be trodden under foot?" (Daniel 8:11-13)

"Yea, whiles I was speaking in prayer, even the man Gabriel,
whom I had seen in the vision at the beginning, being caused
to fly swiftly, touched me about the time of the evening
oblation." (Daniel 9:21)

"And arms shall stand on his part, and they shall pollute
the sanctuary of strength, and shall take away the daily
sacrifice, and they shall place the abomination that maketh
desolate." (Daniel 11:31)

"And from the time that the daily sacrifice shall be taken
away, and the abomination that maketh desolate set up, there
shall be a thousand two hundred and ninety days."
(Daniel 12:11)

In the previous verses, the word 'oblation' is derived from
the Hebrew word 'minchah', pronounced min-khaw', which means
gift, tribute, offering, present, oblation, sacrifice, or
meat offering. This offering was ordered by the Lord in the
Book of Exodus, as well as in the Book of Numbers. It is
called a continual burnt offering because, aside from the
fact that the animal was completely consumed in the fire, it
was performed twice daily throughout the year; in addition
to the various other sacrifices which had to be performed.
These two sacrifices were known appropriately as the morning
and the evening oblation. Consider the following verses:

"Now this is that which thou shalt offer upon the altar; two
lambs of the first year day by day continually. The one lamb
thou shalt offer in the morning; and the other lamb thou
shalt offer at even: And with the one lamb a tenth deal of
flour mingled with the fourth part of an hin of beaten oil;
and the fourth part of an hin of wine for a drink offering.
And the other lamb thou shalt offer at even, and shalt do
thereto according to the meat offering of the morning, and
according to the drink offering thereof, for a sweet savour,
an offering made by fire unto the LORD. This shall be a
continual burnt offering throughout your generations at the
door of the tabernacle of the congregation before the LORD:
where I will meet you, to speak there unto thee."
(Exodus 29:38-42)

"And thou shalt say unto them, This is the offering made by
fire which ye shall offer unto the LORD; two lambs of the
first year without spot day by day, for a continual burnt
offering. The one lamb shalt thou offer in the morning, and
the other lamb shalt thou offer at even; And a tenth part of
an ephah of flour for a meat offering, mingled with the
fourth part of an hin of beaten oil. It is a continual burnt
offering, which was ordained in mount Sinai for a sweet
savour, a sacrifice made by fire unto the LORD."
(Numbers 28:3-6)

Based upon the actual Hebrew word used in these verses, the
sacrificial animals which were used in these offerings were
young sheep. The word used is 'kebes', pronounced keh-bes',
which means lamb, sheep or young ram. In this same chapter
where the daily sacrifice is described, the Lord also gave
Moses instructions regarding the weekly sabbath sacrifice,
as well as the monthly sacrifice, which was performed at the
beginning of each month throughout the year. In both cases,
the sacrificial animals which were used, were sheep; taken
from the Hebrew words 'ayil', meaning ram, and 'kebes',
which as we have already seen, means young sheep. However,
the Lord continues by telling Moses to use a goat for the
sin offering. Consider the following verses:

"And on the sabbath day two lambs of the first year without
spot, and two tenth deals of flour for a meat offering,
mingled with oil, and the drink offering thereof: This is
the burnt offering of every sabbath, beside the continual
burnt offering, and his drink offering. And in the
beginnings of your months ye shall offer a burnt offering
unto the LORD; two young bullocks, and one ram, seven lambs
of the first year without spot;...And one kid of the goats
for a sin offering unto the LORD shall be offered, beside
the continual burnt offering, and his drink offering."
(Numbers 28:9-11, 15)

This same pattern is followed in describing the sacrifices
which were made daily during the seven days of the Feast of
Unleavened Bread. As with the monthly sacrifice, the animals
used were two bullocks, a ram and seven lambs. In addition
to these, a goat was used for the atonement of sin:

"And in the fifteenth day of this month is the feast: seven
days shall unleavened bread be eaten. In the first day shall
be an holy convocation; ye shall do no manner of servile
work therein: But ye shall offer a sacrifice made by fire
for a burnt offering unto the LORD; two young bullocks, and
one ram, and seven lambs of the first year: they shall be
unto you without blemish:...And one goat for a sin offering,
to make an atonement for you. Ye shall offer these beside
the burnt offering in the morning, which is for a continual
burnt offering. After this manner ye shall offer daily,
throughout the seven days, the meat of the sacrifice made by
fire, of a sweet savour unto the LORD: it shall be offered
beside the continual burnt offering, and his drink
offering." (Numbers 28:17-19, 22-24)

The offering for the Feast of Firstfruits followed this very
same pattern. This feast occurred following the harvest, and
is described for us in the Book of Leviticus, as well as in
the Book of Numbers. Let us take a look at the verses found
in the Book of Leviticus first:

"Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, When
ye be come into the land which I give unto you, and shall
reap the harvest thereof, then ye shall bring a sheaf of the
firstfruits of your harvest unto the priest: And he shall
wave the sheaf before the LORD, to be accepted for you: on
the morrow after the sabbath the priest shall wave it. And
ye shall offer that day when ye wave the sheaf an he lamb
without blemish of the first year for a burnt offering unto
the LORD." (Leviticus 23:10-12)

Following this burnt offering, the Israelites were to wait
an additional jubilee of fifty days past this offering, and
then offer a second meat offering. In verse seventeen below,
the Lord states 'they are the firstfruits unto the LORD'; so
this seems to be an indication that this offering was really
a continuation of the Feast of Firstfruits:

"And ye shall count unto you from the morrow after the
sabbath, from the day that ye brought the sheaf of the wave
offering; seven sabbaths shall be complete: Even unto the
morrow after the seventh sabbath shall ye number fifty days;
and ye shall offer a new meat offering unto the LORD. Ye
shall bring out of your habitations two wave loaves of two
tenth deals: they shall be of fine flour; they shall be
baken with leaven; they are the firstfruits unto the LORD.
And ye shall offer with the bread seven lambs without
blemish of the first year, and one young bullock, and two
rams: they shall be for a burnt offering unto the LORD, with
their meat offering, and their drink offerings, even an
offering made by fire, of sweet savour unto the LORD. Then
ye shall sacrifice one kid of the goats for a sin offering,
and two lambs of the first year for a sacrifice of peace
offerings." (Leviticus 23:15-19)

"Also in the day of the firstfruits, when ye bring a new
meat offering unto the LORD, after your weeks be out, ye
shall have an holy convocation; ye shall do no servile work:
But ye shall offer the burnt offering for a sweet savour
unto the LORD; two young bullocks, one ram, seven lambs of
the first year;...And one kid of the goats, to make an
atonement for you. Ye shall offer them beside the continual
burnt offering, and his meat offering, (they shall be unto
you without blemish) and their drink offerings."
(Numbers 28:26-27, 30-31)

The Feast of Trumpets which occurred on the first day of the
seventh month was no exception. It followed the same pattern
by using one young bullock, one ram, seven lambs and one kid
of the goats to make an atonement for sin:

"And in the seventh month, on the first day of the month, ye
shall have an holy convocation; ye shall do no servile work:
it is a day of blowing the trumpets unto you. And ye shall
offer a burnt offering for a sweet savour unto the LORD; one
young bullock, one ram, and seven lambs of the first year
without blemish:...And one kid of the goats for a sin
offering, to make an atonement for you: Beside the burnt
offering of the month, and his meat offering, and the daily
burnt offering, and his meat offering, and their drink
offerings, according unto their manner, for a sweet savour,
a sacrifice made by fire unto the LORD."
(Numbers 29:1-2, 5-6)

In addition to the annual Day of Atonement offerings which
were performed on the tenth day of the seventh month, the
Lord instructed Moses to make other sacrifices on that day
as well. These were identical to those which Aaron performed
during the sacrifice at the beginning of each month, during
the Feast of Unleavened Bread, during the Feast of the
Firstfruits, and during the Feast of Trumpets. Like them, it
required two bullocks, a ram, seven lambs and a goat for the
sin offering; which was used in addition to the goat which
was used for the annual Day of Atonement sacrifice. In other
words, it appears that there were at least two goats which
were used as an atonement for sin on the Day of Atonement.
This is made clear by the following verses:

"And ye shall have on the tenth day of this seventh month an
holy convocation; and ye shall afflict your souls: ye shall
not do any work therein: But ye shall offer a burnt offering
unto the LORD for a sweet savour; one young bullock, one
ram, and seven lambs of the first year; they shall be unto
you without blemish:...One kid of the goats for a sin
offering; beside the sin offering of atonement, and the
continual burnt offering, and the meat offering of it, and
their drink offerings." (Numbers 29:7-8, 11)

Five days later, on the fifteenth day of the seventh month,
when the seven-day Feast of Tabernacles began, we again see
this same pattern being followed. The only difference was
that on the first day of the feast, thirteen bullocks were
offered; and on each of the six days which followed, one
bullock less was offered; so that on the seventh day, only
seven bullocks were offered. In addition to the bullocks
which were offered on each day, there were also offered two
rams, fourteen lambs, and the one goat for the sin offering
on each of the seven days. The following verse accompanies
each of the seven days of the Feast of Tabernacles:

"And one kid of the goats for a sin offering; beside the
continual burnt offering, his meat offering, and his drink
offering." (Numbers 29:16)

On the eighth day following the Feast of Tabernacles, there
was a solemn assembly, during which time, another sacrifice
was made. This consisted of one bullock, one ram, seven
lambs, and the one goat for an atonement of sin:

"On the eighth day ye shall have a solemn assembly: ye shall
do no servile work therein: But ye shall offer a burnt
offering, a sacrifice made by fire, of a sweet savour unto
the LORD: one bullock, one ram, seven lambs of the first
year without blemish:...And one goat for a sin offering;
beside the continual burnt offering, and his meat offering,
and his drink offering." (Numbers 29:35-36, 38)

Hundreds of years later, after the destruction of the First
Temple by the forces of Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar, the
Lord gave the Prophet Ezekiel new instructions regarding the
Second Temple and the Altar. These would be built under the
leadership and inspiration of men like Zerubbabel, Ezra and
Nehemiah. In describing the seven-day purification process
of the Altar, the Lord also instructed that a goat be used
for the atonement of sin:

"And on the second day thou shalt offer a kid of the goats
without blemish for a sin offering; and they shall cleanse
the altar, as they did cleanse it with the bullock. When
thou hast made an end of cleansing it, thou shalt offer a
young bullock without blemish, and a ram out of the flock
without blemish. And thou shalt offer them before the LORD,
and the priests shall cast salt upon them, and they shall
offer them up for a burnt offering unto the LORD. Seven days
shalt thou prepare every day a goat for a sin offering: they
shall also prepare a young bullock, and a ram out of the
flock, without blemish. Seven days shall they purge the
altar and purify it; and they shall consecrate themselves.
And when these days are expired, it shall be, that upon the
eighth day, and so forward, the priests shall make your
burnt offerings upon the altar, and your peace offerings;
and I will accept you, saith the Lord GOD."
(Ezekiel 43:22-27)

Several chapters later, in describing the seven-day Feast of
Unleaven Bread which followed the Passover, while the number
of bullocks and rams being offered had changed from earlier
years when first instituted by Moses, the kid of the goats
was still being used as an atonement for sin, as we see in
the following verses. Not only that, but the Lord instructed
Ezekiel to use the very same procedure for the seven-day
Feast of Tabernacles which occurred in the seventh month as
well:

"In the first month, in the fourteenth day of the month, ye
shall have the passover, a feast of seven days; unleavened
bread shall be eaten. And upon that day shall the prince
prepare for himself and for all the people of the land a
bullock for a sin offering. And seven days of the feast he
shall prepare a burnt offering to the LORD, seven bullocks
and seven rams without blemish daily the seven days; and a
kid of the goats daily for a sin offering. And he shall
prepare a meat offering of an ephah for a bullock, and an
ephah for a ram, and an hin of oil for an ephah. In the
seventh month, in the fifteenth day of the month, shall he
do the like in the feast of the seven days, according to the
sin offering, according to the burnt offering, and according
to the meat offering, and according to the oil."
(Ezekiel 45:21-25)

What we can plainly see from all of the various feast days
and sacrifices which were mandated by the Lord in the Old
Testament, is that while bullocks, rams and lambs were used
a great deal in all of these offerings, the Bible is very
consistent in stating that a goat, and not a lamb, was to be
used as an atonement for sin. The Scriptures speak clearly
regarding this point. As final proof of this, consider the
fact that in Numbers chapter seven, we find the following
verses:

"And it came to pass on the day that Moses had fully set up
the tabernacle, and had anointed it, and sanctified it, and
all the instruments thereof, both the altar and all the
vessels thereof, and had anointed them, and sanctified them;
That the princes of Israel, heads of the house of their
fathers, who were the princes of the tribes, and were over
them that were numbered, offered: And they brought their
offering before the LORD, six covered wagons, and twelve
oxen; a wagon for two of the princes, and for each one an
ox: and they brought them before the tabernacle."
(Numbers 7:1-3)

Following these introductory verses, this lengthy chapter of
eighty-nine verses describes a twelve-day period, during
which time, one head of each of the twelve tribes of Israel,
referred to as a prince, offered up his sacrifices each day.
On each day, a goat was offered as an atonement for sin; so
that in this chapter, we find the following identical verse
twelve different times:

"One kid of the goats for a sin offering:" (Numbers 7:16)

It should be clear then, that the sacrificial 'lamb' for the
atonement of sin, is actually a goat. In part two of this
series, we will continue to study the mystery regarding how
Jesus Christ has come to be symbolized by a white lamb in
our modern times. This will include taking a look at such
topics as our Lord's connection to the Feast of Firstfruits
and the peace offerings, the wicked children of darkness,
the two Passovers, two Egypts and the two Moseses, spiritual
freedom through Christ, Isaiah's Messianic prophecy, the
Parable of the Prodigal Son, and defining the word 'lamb' in
the New Testament. I trust that you will join me.

⇒ Go To The Next Part . . .


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